Connect with us

Ethics & Corrections Policy

Anyone today can publish, broadcast or display information to an audience. What sets us apart as journalists is the degree of professionalism we bring to the task. At Pool Magazine, we’re determined to bring journalism ethics that reflect the highest professional standards. At the core of those standards will be these following guidelines.

Accuracy and fairness are chief among our core values. Consequently, there is perhaps nothing that stands above the need for the news organization to maintain and preserve its integrity. The public’s trust in our work — our most important asset — depends on it.

All errors shall be acknowledged promptly in a straightforward manner, never disguised or glossed over in a follow-up story. Only in rare circumstances, with approval from the Executive Editor, should an attempt be made to remove erroneous content (or content published inadvertently) from the web. When errors are made online, we should correct the errors and indicate that the story has been updated to correct an error or clarify what it says. We always acknowledge our mistakes and set the record straight in a transparent manner.

In considering requests to remove accurate information from our public archives, we should consider not only the person’s interest in suppressing the content but also the public’s interest in knowing the information. Circumstances will guide the decision and must be approved by the Executive Editor. Our policy is not to remove published content from our archives, but we want archives to be accurate, complete and up-to-date, so we will update and correct archived content as needed, including headlines.

Clarifications should be made when a story, photograph, video, caption, editorial, etc. creates a false impression of fact.

A correction or clarification should repeat the original error only if omitting that information fails to provide necessary context for understanding the correction/clarification. For example, a correction such as “The name of Joe Editorowski was incorrectly spelled in a story about the Southern California News Group” is sufficient in print. It is not necessary to repeat the original error. Corrections/clarifications should be appended to the original story online and be located in a consistent place in print.

When there is a question over whether a correction, clarification or removal of story or photo is necessary, bring the matter to an editor.

Reporters or photographers ought to identify themselves to news sources. In the rare instance when circumstances suggest not identifying ourselves, the Executive Editor or appropriate senior editor must be consulted for approval.

Journalists must not plagiarize, whether it is the wholesale lifting of someone else’s writing, or the publication of a press release as news without attribution. SCNG journalists are responsible for their research, just as they are for their reporting. The inadvertent publication of another’s work does not excuse the plagiarism. Plagiarism will result in serious disciplinary action, and may include termination.

While journalists are expected to cover breaking news aggressively, they must not interfere with civil authorities while on assignment. In no circumstance should a journalist break the law. Journalists who feel they have been unlawfully restricted from doing their job are expected to remain calm and professional and report the situation to a ranking editor immediately.

Follow us on Google News
Become a Member of the Pool & Hot Tub AllianceSponsored Advertisement
Pool Magazine App on Google PlayPool Magazine App on Apple Store

Download the NEW Pool Magazine App

Recent Pool News

Advertisement